Nonprofit Nation with Julia Campbell

A Growing Movement for Black Philanthropy and Funding with Floyd Jones

August 03, 2022 Julia Campbell Season 1 Episode 47
Nonprofit Nation with Julia Campbell
A Growing Movement for Black Philanthropy and Funding with Floyd Jones
Show Notes Transcript

Today's podcast is sponsored by Community Boost, a digital marketing agency empowering social ventures changing the world. We invite you to join The Nonprofit Marketing Summit: Fundraise To The Future for free on August 16-18th, the biggest virtual conference for nonprofit professionals!  Get your free ticket to the future at https://www.nonprofitmarketingsummit.org/

Happy Black Philanthropy Month! Black Philanthropy Month is about celebrating not only Black organizations but also Black donors, Black foundations, and Black dollars. It's also about allies recognizing their critical role in supporting this movement. 

Black-led nonprofits receive substantially less investment than organizations that do the same work but have white leadership. The revenue of Black-led organizations is 24% smaller than their white-led counterparts, and their unrestricted net assets are 76% smaller.

In the latest episode of Nonprofit Nation, Julia sat down with Floyd Jones to talk about the growing movement of black philanthropy and funding, and why this movement is critical to racial equity.

Floyd Jones serves as the Community & Partnerships Lead at Givebutter, the #1 rated fundraising platform on G2, powering $300M+ in donations for more than a million changemakers worldwide. Floyd leads the Community Team’s growth strategy via partnerships, sponsorships, strategic campaigns, and special events. 

Throughout his career, Floyd has worked tirelessly building social impact communities around the world. Collectively Floyd has raised over $1M for grassroots organizations and his work has been featured in ESPN, Wired magazine, NIKE, Whole Foods, NBA2k, and more.

Connect with Floyd:

About Julia Campbell, the host of the Nonprofit Nation podcast:

Named as a top thought leader by Forbes and BizTech Magazine, Julia Campbell (she/hers) is an author, coach, and speaker on a mission to make the digital world a better place.

She wrote her book, Storytelling in the Digital Age: A Guide for Nonprofits, as a roadmap for social change agents who want to build movements using engaging digital storytelling techniques. Her second book, How to Build and Mobilize a Social Media Community for Your Nonprofit, was published in 2020 as a call-to-arms for mission-driven organizations to use the power of social media to build movements.

Take Julia’s free nonprofit masterclass, ​3 Must-Have Elements of Social Media That Converts

Julia Campbell:

today's podcast is sponsored by community boost a digital marketing agency, empowering social ventures changing the world. Community boost invites you to join the nonprofit marketing Summit. fundraise to the future for free on August 16 through 18th. It's the biggest virtual conference for nonprofit marketers. You'll be joined by 20,000 Like minded professionals as we step into the future of digital strategy, and you'll be learning from leaders like Mallory Erickson, Amy sample Ward, Adrian Sargeant, Mehta, Tiktok, myself and many more, get your free ticket to the future at WWW dot nonprofit marketing summit.org. See you there. Hello, and welcome to nonprofit Nation. I'm your host, Julia Campbell. And I'm going to sit down with nonprofit industry experts, fundraisers, marketers, and everyone in between to get real and discuss what it takes to build that movement that you've been dreaming of. I created the nonprofit nation podcast to share practical wisdom and strategies to help you confidently Find Your Voice. Definitively grow your audience and effectively build your movement. If you're a nonprofit newbie, or an experienced professional, who's looking to get more visibility, reach more people and create even more impact than you're in the right place. Let's get started. Hi, everyone. Welcome back to nonprofit nation. This is your host, Julia Campbell. And I'm super excited to be celebrating Black philanthropy month. And if you don't know what black philanthropy month is, it's about celebrating not only black organizations, but also black donors, black foundations and black dollars. And it's also about allies recognizing their critical role in supporting this movement. I will put a lot of links in the show notes if you want to learn more about how to participate in this month. But we have a very special guest my friend and fabulous human Floyd Jones is here. And Floyd serves as a community and partnerships lead at give butter, the number one rated fundraising platform on G two, what is G two, Floyd?

Floyd Jones:

O G two. It's like the platform for raising all tech. So if you look on G two you can you can compare software companies, you can compare your fundraising platforms if you're trying to decide you know, who might not have fun with that today, you can go on Jeetu and you hear the thing that I love that you hear real reviews from real people. So it's not like me rigging anything. It's like real people. So yeah,

Julia Campbell:

well, we love give butter and give butter is powering over $300 million in donations for more than a million changemakers worldwide. And Floyd leads the community team's growth strategy via partnerships, sponsorships, strategic campaigns and special events. And also incredible receptions, like we had at AFP icon where I ate my face off. I mean, that was really, really fun. And throughout his career Floyd's work tirelessly building social impact communities around the world. And what I love is that a lot of people tend to work in tech or maybe work as consultants, but they don't actually have the receipts but Floyd does. So Floyd has raised over $1 million for grassroots organizations. And his work has been featured in ESPN, Wired Magazine, Nike Whole Foods, NBA 2k, and more. And welcome for it. I'm so happy to have you here.

Floyd Jones:

I feel so honored. First of all, I know one has said Floyd brings a receipt. So that's like a great way to start this conversation. I love it.

Julia Campbell:

Yes. And so just give butter. But let's start with your journey into nonprofits and a little bit about what you do now.

Floyd Jones:

Yes, I love that. So I would say my story and my fundraising story really started off my senior year of college, I actually went to GW along with the founders of give butter. So we have this kindred history, which has been really exciting. But my senior year, so I studied music and International Affairs in school. I've been really passionate about arts humanities community, and really how it impacts international development. And so my senior year of school, I went to South Africa I had been before for like maybe like a two week tour. But this time, I was actually doing a month long research project with the Boko Moso Youth Foundation, and it was probably one of the most transformative experiences to date for me. So the foundation and the center is based in a small township called Winterfell. And that area was actually a ghetto that was created during a part time so it was actually constructed by the government and a lot of the health outcomes comes there for especially youth and young adults. You know, there's high teenage pregnancy rates, there's high HIV rates, there's high dropout rates. But a lot of the students and youth who went to this center in particular went on to becoming teachers and doctors and practitioners, a lot of the youth who actually went to the program are actually leading the program today. And it was so beautiful to witness and experience. And when I was there, they were doing, you know, they didn't call it art therapy, but they were doing art therapy. Every single morning, we were singing songs every single morning, we were, you know, they were writing poetry, they were actually making art. And we actually even had an art therapy group, you know, come and do a program there. It was incredibly beautiful. And so when I came back to the States, I was like, What can I do? And if you know me at all, you know that I'm action oriented. I'm like, what's the next move. And so they were planning a tour, to actually fundraise and keep the center open. And so that year, I helped work with them to organize a tour. And the tour ended up raising over $300,000. And that money all went to fund the center and keep programs alive. And it was just And that's I was like, I think I'm good at this. I think I liked this. I always called fundraising sales of the soul in a way and but really, the thing that I love about it is how can you mobilize people? How can you bring together communities for collective impact. And so I actually saw that in real time, and in real action, and I said, I want to do this. And that kind of started me on my road with fundraising. And so since then, I've worked with, you know, a myriad of small organizations, one of the ordinances I'm most proud of is the bowl Kids Foundation, I was there actually, before coming to give butter. And I was like, their first real fundraiser for the company for the organization helped grow them from one city to eight cities across the country. And that's where I really learned infrastructure building when it comes to fundraising and development. And so fast forward a few years, I found Max again, the CEO of get better because of GW and our connection there. And none of the founders had really worked with nonprofits. And so I thought it as an opportunity as employee number six, I get better, which was really cool. And I found an opportunity to help them touch and reach the nonprofit community a little bit more. And so that leads me to where I'm at today, which is wonderful.

Julia Campbell:

Amazing. How long have you been with gift butter

Floyd Jones:

next month will be two years, it's very strange to say like one of the most senior lino senior people, our longest people at that company has only been there for two years. But to be honest, the first four years of good butter because the majority of our history has been bootstrapped. It was just the three founders doing the work getting into it, figuring out how they can best serve nonprofits. And so when I came on me that you know, the pandemic hit really, and that's kind of the thing that propelled get to the next level, because we were offering you know, we were the first people to offer live streaming fundraising on a platform, we're the first one to offer Venmo fundraising on a platform. So lots of different things that kind of took us to the next level. And so I've seen my role evolve over time. But now, I believe, mostly focus on community and partnerships, how can I actually listen to our users? How can I actually listen to the to the nonprofit's using the platform and really facilitate partnerships and facilitate programs that help them scale to the next level?

Julia Campbell:

Oh, I think that's incredible. So I wanted to have you on several, and we could talk about everything. But you wrote a blog post that really stuck with me called advancing racial equity and nonprofits, a growing movement for black philanthropy and funding. And you wrote on the gift butter site, and we'll link to it in the show notes. And you wrote about the moment that you realized, and this is a quote, not all giving is created equal, share that moment.

Floyd Jones:

So that's a great a great point. So I was reflecting. And I've had to be honest, it's been a few moments. But one moment, in particular that comes to me is when I was an active fundraiser, I was at an event, it was the foundation of a bank actually, was running this event. And there was a bunch of there's a myriad of fundraisers at this event, because everyone was vying for the same funding, essentially. And I was the only black fundraiser in the room. And I recall, we were all you know, drinking wine and talking and whatnot. And there's one person in particular I will never forget this conversation and she looked at me and was like, you know, oh, my gosh, you know, you're young, you're black foundations are just kind of eat you up. And I was like, I was really taken aback by that statement. I was like, okay, but in that moment, it's a few things pointed out. One was the tokenism, right, like and the idea of, you know, being the only right and saying, Okay, well, I'm gonna go and wave this flag and I'm going to be this banner for black fundraisers everywhere, but then to it kind of spoke to the disparity right that like, okay, hey, what if we have a pool of funding as a as a as a philanthropic organization, we got to make sure we throw a bone to one or two black LED nonprofits or one or two black fundraisers in the space. The third thing that, you know, was really eye opening to me was the fact that I was the only person in that room. And I think that that sort of kind of, you know, led a theme for me that I realized I was like, Man And being a black fundraiser is not easy. You know what I mean? First of all, the fact that I was even in this invite only room was spoke a lot of volumes, right? Because there are a lot of things that take place behind closed doors, right? A lot of power moves, a lot of opportunities. A lot of grant funding happens behind closed doors, and the fact that you know, how many institutions are invite only right? Can we talk about that for a second, right? And so the fact that, you know, I was one of the privileged few, but I thought to myself, Man, how many people are missing out on this? How many people are not in the room where things happen, just because they don't know the right person? You know what I mean? And also, we don't even tell what the nonprofit industrial complex, but there's this white savior ism, that takes place in the philanthropic community. And I feel like my majority of my time, I had to almost pander in a way to be like, Oh, pick me, and we need your help. You know what I mean, knowing that, especially this particular funder hadn't done the work in the communities that we were in, right, or I didn't feel like I had, I felt I had to check every single box, just to feel like I was even good enough to show up to the table, right. And so I think that that kind of like, was very eye opening to me, and made me really realize that, hey, this goes deeper than just me. And it really kind of propelled me on this path of how are we finding more racial justice and economic justice, specifically within the philanthropic community?

Julia Campbell:

Let's talk about the stats, I have some in front of me, even though Black communities are some of the most philanthropic in the world, black led organizations only receive a small fraction of the billions of dollars that are donated by Americans every year. And then, in addition, black LED nonprofits receive substantially less investment, then other organizations that do the same work would have white leadership. And I was looking at a recent review a study of early stage organizations. And it showed that the revenue of black led organizations is 24% Smaller than white LED counterparts and their unrestricted net assets are 76%. Smaller. So when we talk about the importance of black philanthropy month, why is supporting Black funded nonprofits an integral piece to advancing racial equity?

Floyd Jones:

Wow, that's a good question. You know, it's really hard to talk about for them dropping, you know, equity without looking at the inequalities, you know, across the board in a way, because in my opinion, philanthropic inequality, really is just another symptom of the grander chasms that already exist, right? So if you look across the board, if let's just look at black households, compared to white households, right, black household, on average, has about 12.7% of the wealth that a typical white household has, right this the Center for American Progress, I believe they put produce a study that said on average, a black household has about $24,000, compared to $189,000, that a white household has, right. But then it's easy to talk about wealth from a numbers perspective, but also talking about wealth and the power that it wields in society, right? When you think about voting, right and policy, right? Well, it helps determine your voting, it determines who's actually going to be elected into public office, it determines that you know, what campaigns you can actually donate to, it determines the amount of time you have to spend on you know, in advocating for people in your community. It also determines your money in emergencies, right. Like, let's look at the pandemic and the the Well, the great disparities that were offered even during the pandemic, right, on average black people, their jobs were more likely to be cut and deemed unnecessary, right. And for the people who did go to where black people on average, are more likely to be having to go in person. So they were more susceptible, more vulnerable. They're the ones who are most likely had to actually tap into their savings are an average of black household savings of less than a white household savings. So it's so important to say that, hey, this economic injustice is now systemic racism is now systemic and actually built into the fabric of American society. Right. And so philanthropy is you would think that philanthropy is going to cover the gaps, right? Because where slavery didn't mean it, where it was embedded into Jim Crow was embedded into things like criminal justice and education and jobs and whatnot, you think that philanthropy would be the one to cover and close those gaps. But really, when we look at the numbers, when we go deeper, we see that this is actually just continuing to reflect the gaps that already exist on a macro level, right? And so philanthropic justice, and my opinion is so incredibly important. Because if we can start to get that right, if we can start to D we'll private dollars and wield the dollars in the hands of these major institutions and foundations. How much more can we say, Hey, we are pushing back. And so I was actually talking to Dr. copelan, the founder of Backlinko. I think she is such a hero in my eyes. But one of the things that we were just talking about literally yesterday was that this is yes, it is a movement. But it's also a statement. And one of the things that I love that you said at the beginning was that black communities are one of the most philanthropic communities in the world, not just in America, but across the diaspora. Right? We will not call it philanthropy, men call it you know, coming to the fish fry, or bring your tithes and offerings, you know what I'm saying, but we are the most one of the most philanthropic communities in the world. And so this movement that I love so much, and I felt very compelled to bring Gibbler along with with saying, Hey, how are we not only continuing to provide resources and tools to add capacity to black led organization? But how are we actually mobilizing our dollars together to make a real collective impact, right. And so now, because this exists, we're opening up the doors for other companies, for other people to say, Hey, I see you, I acknowledge you. And I'm going to come alongside you to continue to amplify the things that you're doing. Wow.

Julia Campbell:

Thank you. That was incredible. So I was reading the Bridgespan group, their research that they did with an organization called Echoing Green. And what I found so interesting about it is that they they wrote colorblind grant making, even when grounded in a well meaning attempted equity is at the crux of the problem. So what do you say to funders that say, Oh, well, our funding is colorblind.

Floyd Jones:

First thing to me. Okay, so this is a whole situation. First of all, if you're colorblind, like, I don't understand that statement, but I think that here's the thing, we have to talk about the root as well, right? Okay. So everybody wants to be colorblind, and I'll even talk to myself, I'm gonna tell him myself. Okay. So we were planning another major initiative, right? And we were thinking about how do we you know, create all of the different standards will say, right, that for people can live into these things, right? But a lot of times our selves or even grant making institutions, right, who are the people at the table, who are deciding what is worthy, right? Who are the people at the table who are deciding what can fit in and what what meets the bar, what what passes their bar, and what is below the bar, right? Because there is bias built into their thinking and standards as well, right? Even myself, an educated person, I come from an upper middle class household, I have resources and I have connections, right? That entire thinking is a different mindset. And I'll use, I use a black Fairy Godmother all the time. She is so amazing. If you look her up on Instagram, you're gonna be blown away because I was born with him when I met her. But she was telling me her story. She is tremendous, right? She's verified on Instagram. Now, People Magazine has covered her she's at sponsorship with Instacart. She's amazing, but she still needs support. And she told me that when she was getting her foundation off the ground, because she's a single mom, she was doing this work to mobilize resources for people in her community who had similar experiences to her. She told me that she was turned down by seven different foundation, okay, seven different foundations who all say in their mission, that they're meant to help people in her position, right? And so because she didn't meet the criteria, because she didn't fit the standards that they deemed appropriate. And they said, Hey, if you meet these standards, and you are worthy, right, she decided, hey, I'm just gonna start my own right? And how many people are saying we have to figure this out, we have to turn to our own, we can turn to our own community because there are so many gatekeepers, like we were talking about, right. So in order to think about like, when we think about colorblind, nothing is ever really colorblind, because you have to think about who is sitting at the table who is making this criteria, who was sitting at the table was enforcing this criteria, because if they're not coming and addressing and announcing an understanding their own biases, it's going to show up naturally going to show up in the people that they select and that they deem worthy.

Julia Campbell:

I love that the black fairy godmother, I just looked her up following her on Instagram. She's also on Twitter, the black Fairy Godmother official? That's phenomenal. Do you think that speaks to? I don't know if it's if it's communities of color, but do you think it speaks to a general trend in people tending to give money and kind of almost assuming things like donor advised funds or foundations and just giving their money away? Like MacKenzie Scott,

Floyd Jones:

who, that's another main topic. So I think it's it's it's both and right, like, I think that one, if you have the resources, you are automatically have a seat at the table, right? In many spaces. You have a seat at the table, but I think it's both and it's the resources, meeting the community. Right. And so I think that one of the things that I've been seeing throughout my time doing this work is that we have this idea that only a certain amount of people or a certain group of people can dictate where funds go, and then they get perplexed when the situation isn't eradicated or where they're still Divide, right. And so there's this uprising. And there's this movement, rightfully so where you actually need to bring the people your dollars are going bring them to the table with you, right? Bring them to the table with you. One of the things I love the downtown Women's Center in LA, they're a Gibbler user. And we have people from our team, from their, from their organization. And I absolutely just love what they're doing. But one of the things that I love that they were that we were talking about is that they actually communicate with the people who they're even, they're going to be reaching out to you, whether it be in marketing material, whether it be in the services that they're providing, they actually build a program with their people and not just for their people. Right. And I think that that is a difference that needs to take place, especially in philanthropy, build these programs with the people who you're meant to fund because they're the ones who know how the dollar should be spent. They're the ones who know where you need to invest. It might not be the person who based on your bells and whistle, maybe sometimes it's a it's a community organizer down the street, who's been working with the kids after school, teaching them different life skills, teaching them how to grow a garden and whatnot. Like those are the everyday changemakers that I hope in my life, I can be a part of amplifying and supporting because they're the so often people that get looked over.

Julia Campbell:

I love that build a program with your people, not for your people. I would love to have them on the podcast, actually to talk about that. So since we're celebrating Black philanthropy month in August, you talked about meeting Dr. Jackie Bouvier Copeland, who is the founder. And can you tell us that story?

Floyd Jones:

Ah, that was like a dream come true. So I actually learned about black philanthropy month. Wow, I guess it's been like five years ago. Now I learned about it. Immediately. I was like, I gotta figure out a way to get involved. I want to be a part of this. Because, as I mentioned earlier, a lot of times throughout my, you know, history as a fundraiser, I felt really alone, right? Like, there was no, there was nobody that I felt looked like me. And it wasn't until you know, getting into give better. And to be honest, being in an organization that has more access, right? Like before, I was with a lot of grassroots organizations, and we just didn't even know but being in this position, I've had a lot more access. But I've been blessed enough to find, you know, people from African American Development Offices network and meeting via get Burton Smith, she's so incredibly wonderful. And when I was getting this, you know, black lymphoma initiative off the ground, just lending her ear to me, or Christopher Beck at St. Jude, like, there's so many people who really come alongside me and said, Hey, you're not alone, I actually see you and I want to support you. And I want to help you in your journey. And that, for me has been so so incredibly valuable. And so meeting her when we got the one of the things that I one of my stipulations, I was like, I'm not going to where we can't say we're doing a black philanthropy month initiative, unless we actually have the black philanthropy organization on board and the people who are spearheading this initiative on board. And so when I finally got to meet her, I was just blown away. She's just, she's more amazing if that's even possible than all the accolades, you know, that have been written about her. I mean, she's been named one of the most fun topic people in America, right and has been doing just such amazing, amazing work. But one of the things that I really love is just her humility, right? I love how she truly it shows up to work every single day, even today, I've been doing this work for decades, right? And still says, Hey, there's more work to be done. How can I be used? How can I continue to be a servant leader? And that's just something that I continue to aspire to live into all forever. So it was amazing. I got chills. Oh, a

Julia Campbell:

servant leader. I love when we meet our heroes. Meet people that really inspire us.

Floyd Jones:

And when they live up to the hype, right, like and sort of half the height, right? Because Lord knows, I met a couple people. And I'm like, well, great, amen. God bless.

Julia Campbell:

It's very southern. You seem very hopeful. So in your writing, you talk about a paradigm shift. So you write that you believe a paradigm shift is underway, where organizations are the ones building power, and that people are becoming writers of their destiny. So how do you see things shifting in positive ways?

Floyd Jones:

Yeah, I mean, I think first of all, like, you know, when George Floyd, you know, was killed, that really sparked so much, I was just speaking to the amazing people at the giving, that I was just speaking with them, you know, a few days ago, and their whole organization, you know, really continue to take charge and really continue to flourish after this. And I'm super excited and hopeful to be able to continue to work with them in the future as well. But you see so many different groups like this popping up all over. But the thing that I love is that this is not the beginning. Right? You think about the generation that came right before this. You think about movements like black philanthropy month and all of these different amazing movements have been built upon other movements and kit that came before this right and The thing that I love is that I feel like it's finally reaching a head, I finally feel like it's finally coming to the surface. I was just talking to you about this beforehand that like, you know, when we were launching this initiative, I was like, hey, I really need support of people who have access, who have power, who have a platform to continue to spread the word. And the fact that people mobilize and came alongside was so brilliant and so beautiful. And so I think that, and we're seeing a lot of these, these, you know, these groups, black philanthropy month groups, we're seeing groups like gift, butter, you know, companies who are taking a stand, and not just, you know, saying it, but actually putting real monetary dollars behind it. And I think I always say, the journey that change the world begins with a single person, you know, what I mean, and that person is you that person is you, you might not be able to change your impact on the person. But if you change your own life, and you let that change shine through, then that shine is going to shine a light on another person, and then when they shine another person, and it's going to continue to go forth. So all you have to do is focus on changing yourself. And even if you don't know how to change yourself, say, Hey, I'm willing and able to change, you know what I mean? And that starts at all.

Julia Campbell:

So how can white LED organizations and allies participate? I know you just gave us some really great tips there. What are some other ways that white LED organizations allies, such as myself participate support the movement?

Floyd Jones:

One is with money, I think actually having a real funds or Hey,

Julia Campbell:

exactly what your money where your mouth is, people

Floyd Jones:

1,000% 1,000% actually committing real actual funds to these things, because the revolution needs to be funded. Because it's real. We don't want to just talk about the divine and philanthropy. I mean, I remember having this conversation, and I feel honestly so blessed to be at an organization that understands this, right? But like, you know, it was a no brainer, right? And being like, hey, we need these real funding for these real organizations to do this real thing. You need that, you know, and I think that so many different people, and, and hey, we're a fast growing tech company, right? We have deliverables that we need to meet, we have bottom lines that we need to meet, but we still believe they don't have to be mutually exclusive. Right? We still believe we can do good work and be good stewards, because that's what we're meant to do. You know what I mean? And so real, real money is important. But then also, I would say, attention and advocacy, right? Like what we're doing right now, we're speaking on a podcast, we're speaking on a highly rated podcast, okay, we're talking about LinkedIn approved, we're talking about people who know your name, okay. But you're lending your platform so that this can have more light on it. And I think that more people need to do that, and not be so worried about saving face, right and saying the right thing, but being the right person,

Julia Campbell:

not being so worried about saying the right thing, but being the right person that really resonates with me.

Floyd Jones:

And then lastly, is advocacy, right? We talk a lot about open doors. And I think that that's just so key. I mean, I always said I would not be where I am in my career, I would not be in my life, if I didn't have mentors, if I didn't have people who frankly did not look like me, right, who are opening up doors. And we're saying, hey, you need to be in this room, hey, I believe you have a place here and opening that door and paving that way. And so I think that so many grassroots organization organizers, so many community leaders don't have those same doors being open for them. And so in order to open up doors, you need to know who you're opening those doors for. Right? And that means you need to go and actually speak to somebody you to actually make yourself available to talk to somebody who doesn't look like you, right? Be willing to hear their conversations and open up that door. And one thing that I've been loving and okay, I might be an anomaly. But I actually have been loving LinkedIn recently, I've been connecting with so many amazing people who I don't know, and who don't look like me and having amazing conversations, hearing their amazing stories, and then really being taught how can we support one another right? And like that goes such a long way.

Julia Campbell:

And that brings me right? I mean, it's brings us full circle, because I want to talk about what gift butter is doing to celebrate Black philanthropy months.

Floyd Jones:

Yes. So we are launching our first ever give butter give back back philanthropy initiative. So a little bit of background, give it harkens back has been a Baby of mine since starting to work at give butter. And it's an initiative where we truly no strings attached and give money back to nonprofit organizations and people who literally fund and fuel us we are funding them directly. And it's been such an amazing, passionate project that I've been able to do. And so we have a specific focus for black philanthropy month this August and we're giving away up to $10,000 to black LED nonprofits or nonprofits that specifically uplift and support black communities. If you go to give it a.com backslash black philanthropy month, and it'll be in the show notes as well. You can check it out you have until August 26 To apply, but we want to see who is doing the work and we want to be able to give back and invest back and this will continue to grow over time. But yeah, that's the main thing.

Julia Campbell:

Yes. So go Yeah, give butter.com and you'll find more information also I will be tweeting about Gotta give better as a lot of partners that will be sharing the information. So stay tuned. I've seen it a lot of newsletters already, which I think is phenomenal. I know give better speaking at the nonprofit marketing Summit, which is the sponsor of this episode, actually, community boost. We love them.

Floyd Jones:

We love community boosts. Yes, community Boost is the

Julia Campbell:

best. So they'll be very excited that they there. This is one of the episodes that they're sponsoring. But yeah, stay tuned, Google if you you know, I'm gonna put all of it in the show notes. But I really I love the fact that you're giving away real dollars. And it's not just sort of giving away a tweet or featuring people on your website, which I think you do, and I think it's fantastic. But giving away real dollars really putting your money where your mouth is, there's really no, there's no better saying than that, I think.

Floyd Jones:

And I believe this is just the beginning. I feel like I've been so I spend so much time on the other side of the aisle, you know, doing the asking, and now that I am in a position of power, I am facilitating the giving, I am ready to just give Okay, we're gonna be given and we're gonna be supporting people for the cause. I can't wait.

Julia Campbell:

I love it. So where can people find you and get in touch Floyd?

Floyd Jones:

Yes, we're just talking about LinkedIn. You can find me on LinkedIn, Floyd Jones, three. Okay, the number three Floyd Jones, three on LinkedIn. Or you can go to Floyd jones.co join my newsletter and just stay involved there.

Julia Campbell:

Thank you so much. Happy Black philanthropy month. And hopefully I'll see you in person soon.

Floyd Jones:

Yes, Happy Black philanthropy mom in black y'all.

Julia Campbell:

Well, hey there, I wanted to say thank you for tuning into my show, and for listening all the way to the end. If you really enjoyed today's conversation, make sure to subscribe to the show and your favorite podcast app, and you'll get new episodes downloaded as soon as they come out. I would love if you left me a rating or review because this tells other people that my podcast is worth listening to. And then me and my guests can reach even more earbuds and create even more impact. So that's pretty much it. I'll be back soon with a brand new episode. But until then, you can find me on Instagram at Julia Campbell seven seven. Keep changing the world. Nonprofit unicorn